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ABOUT US

KLA is a 501(c)(3) non-profit, volunteer organization committed to maintaining the health and safety of Keoka Lake by educating its membership about environmental threats, environmentally conscious and proactive best practices, and safe boating practices to protect those who enjoy its waters.

OUR COMMUNITY

KLA was founded in 1971 by a group of year-round and summer residents who were concerned about:

  • Protecting the water quality of Keoka Lake,

  • Rebuilding the dam to maintain the water level throughout the summer,

  • Conducting regular water testing,

  • Developing the early foundations for educational and environmental work, and

  • Managing the lake water level with the Mason Dam.

 

​KLA now boasts the highest percentage of shore owner memberships (80+%) of any lake in the area.  Join us by becoming a member.

WHAT WE DO

KLA 's focus is to maintain the clarity and health of the lake. This is a three-pronged approach of:

  • Prevention by education, water quality monitoring, boat inspections, and LakeSmart,

  • Detection by plant patrol and stream surverys, and

  • Eradication by having a reserve fund to allow for immediate action.

KLA also builds community through communication and events.​

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PREVENTION

A major component of prevention is education.  KLA is focused on engaging people, young and old, in actively participating in the health and future of Keoka Lake.  KLA hosts programs and events that further education and fun on the lake. 

KLA also sponsors programs that help prevent water quality issues.  These include:

  • Water quality monitoring:  The primary focus of volunteer water quality monitoring is the collection of information related to changes in lake biological productivity over time. Water quality data gathered by volunteers can be used to determine whether individual lakes are becoming more productive, less productive, or are stable. Many years of data are generally required to make these determinations with confidence.  Read more...

  • Courtesy Boat Inspections (CBI):   The Courtesy Boat Inspection program utilizes paid and volunteer inspectors of boats entering and leaving Maine lakes in an attempt to halt the spread of invasives.  The CBI program is voluntary but seeks to educate recreational boaters and fishermen to the dangers of invasives being introduced into Maine's lakes and rivers. The goal is to encourage voluntary self-inspection of boats entering and leaving Maine waters.  Read more...

  • LakeSmart:  LakeSmart is a program that offers free opportunities for homeowners to learn how to manage their lakeside properties to protect their lake's water quality.   Read more...

 
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DETECTION

A major component of prevention is education.  KLA is focused on engaging people, young and old, in actively participating in the health and future of Keoka Lake.  KLA hosts programs and events that further education and fun on the lake. 

KLA also sponsors programs that help prevent water quality issues.  These include:

  • Plant Patrol:  Plant patrollers are the "Early Detection" part of the fight against milfoil.  Lake users know when something abnormal shows up.  Read more...

  • Stream Surveys:   KLA members conduct stream surveys of  the various streams that feed into Keoka Lake.  They are looking for evidence of overbanking that can be mitigated to reduce erosion and sediment getting into the lake, picking up trash, and meeting with property owners.  Read more...

 
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ERADICATION

KLA works closely with the Lakes Environmental Association team.  LEA has been working since 2003 on controlling variable leaf milfoil, one of Maine’s most invasive aquatic plants, on the Songo River and Brandy Pond. Previous to this work, much of the Songo River was infested with this plant, making it nearly impossible to travel through this busy waterway without boating through it. Fragments of milfoil, which can form new colonies, were continually being chopped up and redistributed in the river, downstream to Sebago Lake and up to Brandy Pond.  After more than a dozen tough years, they have finally brought this infestation under control in both the river and Brandy Pond.  Their milfoil control crew is now primarily doing maintenance sweeps for new plants that root in both these waters. However, Sebago still has numerous sites infested with Milfoil and their crew is now working on the worst patches in Sebago Lake and Sebago Cove.  This work is a long-term project and we hope that by working on Sebago we can further reduce infestations in upstream waters and across the state.  Since the discovery of a dense patch of milfoil in Long Lake a few summers ago, their team has restored this area to natural conditions and now uses extensive surveying to identify and prevent new infestations from taking root.  Their efforts on these waterways has also shown us that large infestations can be brought under control with experience, funding, and commitment.   Your donations to KLA and LEA make a difference.